New Beginnings United Methodist Church
1559 Route 56 East - Apollo, PA 15613
History

New Beginnings United Methodist Church was formally known as the Apollo First United Methodist Church and was located in Apollo. The name change occurred when the new building was built on the current lot in Spring Church. The doors of the new church opened November 2009. God has blessed our congregation with a beautiful church and church grounds, including a pavilion. The Preston Busch Pavilion is used for outside services and church functions.

We worship according to the Methodist tradition which centers on the theology of John Wesley.

The underlying energy of the Wesleyan theological heritage stems from an emphasis upon practical divinity, the implementation of genuine Christianity in the lives of believers. The Wesleyan emphasis upon the Christian life-faith and love put into practice has been the hallmark of those traditions now incorporated into the United Methodist Church.

Although, Wesley shared with many other Christians a belief in grace, justification, assurance and sanctification, he combined them in a powerful manner to create distinctive emphases for living the full Christian life.

Grace pervades our understanding of Christian faith and life. By grace, we mean the undeserved, unmerited, and loving action of God in human existence through the ever-present Holy Spirit. While, the grace of God is undivided, it precedes salvation as “prevenient grace,” continues in “justifying grace,” and is brought to fruition in “sanctifying grace.”

We assert that God’s grace is manifested in all creation even though suffering, violence, and evil are ever present. The goodness of creation is fulfilled in human beings, who are called to covenant partnership with God.

God has endowed us with dignity and freedom and has summoned us to responsibility for our lives and the life of the world.

In God’s self-revelation, Jesus Christ, we see the splendor of our true humanity. Even our sin, with its destructive consequences for all creation, does not alter God’s intention for us- holiness and happiness of heart. Nor, does it diminish our accountability for the way we live.

Despite our brokenness, we remain creatures brought into being by a just and merciful God. The restoration of God’s image in our lives requires divine grace to renew our fallen nature.